29 March 2012

1940 US Census Hype!!!


So'o le fau.
To tie together two pieces of fau.
Proverb: To pursue a goal with untied effort

In just a few days the 1940 US Census will be released!! I've found the enumeration district in Los Angeles, California where I will be looking for one of my families. Archives.com made this easy to follow, cool infographic that shows you how to find your families in the 1940 US Census. Check it out!!
 I've used the Unified 1940 Census ED Finder on Stephen P. Morse, PhD  &  Joel D. Weintraub, PhD website that helped me find enumeration numbers for my families. It was quick and easy to use. 
Sign up and help!!! This is the link to the Training page for the 1940 US Census Community Project.


Quote taken from Sutter, Frederic Koehler. “The Day.” Amerika Sãmoa: An Anthropological Photo Essay. Honolulu: University of Hawaii, 1984. page 30. Print.

28 March 2012

1940 US Census. The Greatest Generation


The 1940 US Census is totally exciting for me!! I look at it as the beginning of my dad’s life, even though he was born in 1941. I will learn alot about his side of the family. This census will be the first that will include my dad's parents as a married couple and my dad's siblings will be there, too. I'll be looking for extended family in Hawai'i, California and American Samoa. I’m hoping that it will answer some questions in my Samoan genealogy. For me, the 1940‘s is the Greatest Generation because its the beginning of dad's life.

My dad, Larry Fonoimoana was born on April 1, 1941 in Kahuku, Hawaii. He attended Laie Elementary School. In 1953, my grandparents moved the family to Alameda, California. My dad graduated in 1959 from Encinal High School in Alameda.
 Right after graduation, he joined the Marines and did three tours to Vietnam, with an honorable discharge in 1969. A few years later he married my mom. Hats off to ya dad!!


E a le puga nisi, a le'ana nisi.
Let each do his share of the work.

Help in the Community Project to index the 1940 US Census. 
It helps everyone find their aiga (family).

If you'd like to be a part of indexing the 1940 US Census sign up to help. It's free to sign up. Don't know about indexing click here to the 1940 US Census training site. While you're at it, visit the 1940 Main Blog Indexing Practice Contest. Enter for your chance to win an Amazon Kindle Fire.
To get ready, FamilySearch is hosting one last Google+ hangout before the offical release. Click here for details.
Disclosure: As part of the 1940 Census Ambassador Program this blog post enters me into a drawing for the Amazon Kindle Fire.


22 March 2012

1940 US Census around the corner!!!

Four years ago, I came across a blog that said FamilySearch was seeking indexing help for Hawai'i records. Since I have Samoan family from Hawaii. I wanted to help.  My first experience indexing was great! There was lots of help on the indexing screens that when I was done and submitted my batch, I wanted to do another one. It felt good know to that I was helping my family and others.
From the FamilySearch index program there are two collections for Samoa
and depending on where your ancestors traveled or lived there are other collections to view all for free.
Just take 5 minutes out of your day to help index it makes A HUGE DIFFERENCE for you and others. 

As the 1940 US Census is just around the corner, just by doing a Practice Indexing Simulation of the 1940 US Census and you will have a chance to win a VISA Gift Card. Rules and registration information here. 


Fa'afetai lava (Thank you very much)


Photo is apart of the Wayne A. Forde Collection

American Samoa Historic Preservation Office - A Genealogy Help.

I spent most of the day on this site, The American Samoa Historic Preservation Office. In their words here their Mission Statement,
" It is the responsibility of the American Samoa Historic Preservation Officer to administer the Territorial Historic Preservation Program. American Samoa's strong indigenous culture and traditional system of communal land ownership impose special conditions of cultural sensitivity upon such an endeavor. A primary concern of the ASHPO is to fulfill its responsibilities in a manner that recognizes and honors these inherent cultural conditions.
Visit the site to read more on their Mission Statement. 

Some of the things that I like on this site:
Walking Tour: Click on the Walking Tour, a map comes up and you can view old photos of certain places.

Photo Gallery: The Joseph L. Dwyer Collection 1907-1913, Lepa Church 1928 - 1931, Wayne A. Forde Collection 1940 - 1941, photo from Evan’s Brief and more.

Audio: These are very short that talk about historic and general information.

Links: Samoan, Pacific, Archaeological, Historic Preservation links. These are worth into. Always find things where you least expect it.

Publications: These articles are written by John Enright.

Cultural Organizations: Colleges, Study programs, Libraries and more.

Bibliography: Archaeology, Anthropology and history references related to Samoa. I haven’t checked yet, but you might find these on google books.
http://books.google.com/bkshp?hl=en&tab=wp

Download Library: Historic Documents, Historic Reports, Archaeology and Anthropology
Reports. I found this book, “Walking Tour of Historic Fagatogo”. Intresting. May be some genealogy gems hidden in here too.

Videos: These were nice to view. You can download them as well.

Research Tips: Questions and Contact information for institutions that hold sources of information and history of American Samoa, the American Samoa Historic Preservation Office, the Feleti Barstow Public Library, the Office of Archives and Records Management, and the American Samoa Community College Library.

I really like the Download Library. In some historic reports I learned a little more about the villages my families lived in. I have a family member born in Fagatoga so finding the, Walking Tour of Historic Fagatogo book was exciting for me. It does take some time to look and read through the library but you never know what you might find.

I would like to hear what you find.

15 March 2012

1940: Transportation S.S. Mariposa and the S.S. Malolo

By 1940, my grandparents were living in Laie on the island of Oahu and more Samoans were traveling from Samoa to Hawaii. In those days the only way to get to Hawai'i was by boat. My dad told me that my grandparents traveled on the S.S. Mariposa and the S.S. Malolo to Samoa.  An entry in 1940 of my Grandmother's journal she writes that her brother was traveling from Samoa to Hawaii on the ship, The Mariposa.



To  learn more about the Mariposa. Click here.
Here is a photo of the Mariposo 1940 in Western Samoa.















To learn more about the S.S. Malolo. Click here.

My dad and I watched this vintage video of the S.S. Mariposa and S.S. Malolo. Wow! These ships were beautiful! I would have loved to travel on them.

Mariposa Photo from janeresture.com 

10 March 2012

Arizona Aloha Festival.....

I was in town so, why not check it out! It was great! Lots of Good Food!! Entertainment was awesome! I visited many booths, saw cool t-shirts, lots of island jewelry but, I  didn't see what I was looking for. I was about to give up when I found a booth that had BOOKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Shucks, I was hoping to see a Kramer Augustin Samoa Island Book Vol 1. They didn't have it. Ooohh, well I keep searching. Gottah have that shave ice first!!!













Going for some plate lunch now!!! It's all about the FOOD!!

09 March 2012

1940 News: Tanumafili II Inherits Royal Title of Malietoa

My Grandma Mataniu shared her favorite photo album with me and began to talk about the history and people in the album. She said, “See this man? This is Tanumafili Malietoa, the King of Samoa and my cousin.”  “How is he your cousin Grandma, I asked?”  From her Genealogy ledger she shares her family history.


In 1940, Tanumafili II officially inherited the Royal Title of Malietoa, succeeding the death of his father, Malietoa Tanumafili I. Here is a picture of King Tanumafili II Malietoa  with my Grandma Mataniu Tuia Fonoimoana and husband Teila Fonoimoana in Samoa.


To read more about King Tanumafili II Malietoa visit the links below:
1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malietoa_Tanumafili_II
2. http://www.samoaobserver.ws/index.php?view=article&id=22114%3Ain-memory&option=com_content&Itemid=56
3. http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2007/May/12/br/br3926458107.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDIXQkX329M&feature=related

https://the1940census.com/

07 March 2012

Help Index 1940 US Federal Census/ Rootstech Video's


Not many days till the 1940 US Federal Census is online. Wanna help index and find your families? Sign up!!
 We’ve love to hear, “Who are you looking for?” Share in comments below.

Samoan Genealogy Group went to Rootstech and had an awesome time. It was insipring, educational and fun.  Rootstech.org has posted some of these presentations. Take a few minutes to view one.

Thursday, 11:00 AM Do I Trust the Cloud? By D. Joshua Taylor
Thursday, 1:45 PM Effective Database Search Tactics By Kory Meyerink
Thursday, 3:00 PM Twitter – It’s Not Just “What I Had For Breakfast” Anymore By Thomas MacEntee
Thursday, 4:15 PM Eleven Layers of Online Searches By Barbara Renick

Friday, 8:30 AM Exabyte Social Clouds and Other Monstrosities By Josh Coates
Friday, 9:45 AM Publish Your Genealogy Online By Laura Prescott
Friday, 11:00 AM  Optimizing Your Site for Search Engines By Robert Gardner
Friday, 1:45 PM Genealogists “Go Mobile” By Sandra Crowley
Friday, 3:00 PM Google's Toolbar and Genealogy By David Barney

Saturday, 8:30 AM Making the Most of Technology to Further the Family History Industry By Tim Sullivan
Saturday, 9:45 AM Genealogy Podcasts and Blogs 101By Lisa Louise Cooke
Saturday, 1:45 PM Privacy in a Collaborative Environment By Noah Tutak



01 March 2012

1940 Blog Ambassador- Famous Person I will be looking for??

You may see the nice little badge in the upper left hand corner. Samoan Genealogy Group is an official 1940 Blog Ambassador. The NARA is apart of this community project. Refer to the Feb 28, 2012 blog more on this or visit the NARA site.

One famous person I will be looking for is Freddie Letuli. My grandfather William Kalehuawehe worked with him in Los Angeles, California. I have seen a few pictures of him with my grandfather. However, I don't have with me at the time to post.

Freddy Letuli was also known as Uluao Letuli Misilagi born Apirl 30, 1919 in the Nu'uuli Village of American Samoa. He is known as the Father of the Fire Knife Dance. 
"Freddie Letuli... originated the fire knife dance in 1946 at the Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, previously dancing in Hawaii and Los Angeles with two knives. Along with performing, Freddie was also the teacher to the early fire knife dancers. 
Dating back from the 40's to the 60's, Freddie Letuli performed throughout the US and Europe with his dance troupes formerly known as "Freddie Letuli and the Flaming Sword of Samoa, showcasing his talents and his island. Additional dance troupes (such as the Samoan Warriors, Freddie Letuli and his Wild Polynesians, Freddie Letuli and the Samoans, and Freddie Letuli and the Hawaiians.) were formed to fill his contracts and to keep up with the demand for Polynesian shows. They preformed regularly at various venues in Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Lake Tahoe, Reno, Italy, Chicago, Kentucky, Washington, Australia, and New York.
Freddie's great talents and experise got him on movies like "Pagan Love Song", the 1953 Rita Hayworth film "Salome", and "Sailor Beware", just to name a few. Aside from other movies, he was also seen on television shows and had recurring roles on "Adventures in Paradise" and "The Bob Cummings Show". / With the urging of Governor Rex Lee, Freddie returned home to American Samoa where he joined the Department of Education and taught numerous school children the art of Polynesian dancing. 
Freddie Letuli served as Assistant Director of Tourism, and later served as a Senator in the Legislature of American Samoa, and as an Associate Judge in the High Court of American Samoa. Letuli held the High Talking Cheif title of "Olo" for 40 years. In 2001, he was bestowed as the Paramount Chief title of "Letuli", becoming one of only five Paramount Chiefs in American Samoa./ Freddie died in Honolulu, Hawaii in 2003." Wikipedia
This video is for Tutu Lani McIntire who married Freddie Letuli. In 1998 I met Aunty Lani McIntire. She was a wonderful woman with a great spirit. Watch the video and see some amazing pictures of Freddie Letuli. 
Patricia Letuli tells the story of Freddie Letuli in the book, "Flaming Sword of Samoa