27 May 2013

Memorial Day

The legacy of heroes is the memory of a great name and the inheritance 
of a great example. — Benjamin Disraeli


24 May 2013

Samoan Language Week May 26 - June 1


Speak Your Language


Day
PEC and SBN activities
Sunday 26 May
PEC Lotu at Otahuhu EFKS Church, 58 Station Road, Otahuhu. 
Facebook daily language challenge 1#
Word of the day: Falesa (church)
Monday 27 May
Facebook daily language challenge 2#
Word of the day: Gagana (language)
Profile:  Samoan Language Course Book, Evotia Tamua
Tuesday 28 May
Facebook daily language challenge 3#
Word of the day: Tifaga (movies)
Profile:  South Seas Pictures, Tanupo and Taufau Aukuso
Wednesday 29 May
Facebook daily language challenge 4#
Word of the day: Fa'afetai (thank you)
Profile:  Alofa and Filipo Navigators - Karamia Muller, Author of "How do you say thank you?"
Thursday 30 May
Facebook daily language challenge 5#
Word of the day: Tala (story)
A performance by the PEC Samoan language students
6pm at PEC Manukau Office
Friday 31 May
Facebook daily language challenge 6#
Word of the day: Tusi ata (picture book)
Profile:  Shop Samoa, Rasmus Pereira
Saturday 1 June
Samoan Independence Day
PEC and SBN promoting products at Otara Fleamarket through the Shop Samoa stall.







21 May 2013

FamilyTree Guide

Looking over my FamilyTree on FamilySearch.org I've needed to make a correction on one family member. It is showing that this family member is living but has since passed. I found a link to the FamilyTree Guide on Facebook. Going to look this guide over before I make the correction.
Here is a link to the Family Tree Guide.







18 May 2013

Faumuina photo

Looking over many many old photos. This one however intrigues me. It wasn't unusual for a chief of his age to marry a young maiden. Faumuina, an important Chief of the Faleata district near Apia, and his wife, photographed, probably in the 1890s, by Alfred John Tattersall.



11 May 2013

FamilySearch Wiki- American and Western Samoa

Did you know that FamilySearch Wiki has some great resources for Samoan Genealogy? I've come back to this site several times finding great resources. FamilySearch Wiki shares links, record collections and information helping you in your genealogy research. You can find  FamilySearchWiki on the FamilySearch.org.

Click on "Search" then "Historical Records"

Click on, "Wiki"

Type in the search box, "Samoa". You can also type in "American Samoa or Western Samoa".


I usually select "Samoa (Western and  American)" there are other results that you can choose.


So , here's The Samoa (Western and American) page.


Scrolling down a bit you see the contents of the page.


Today I'm looking at #4 Resources available. I wanted to re-look at the microfilms they have on this page before I head over to the Family History Library Catalog to search for a microfilm I plan on ordering soon in hopes to find a birth record for my great grandfather Opapo. It is estimated that he was born sometime between 1852-1868 in Samoa. Finding a birth record in that time frame I've been told is impossible. With all the wars happening between the Samoans and outside influences of other countries trying to gain control of Samoa. The only chances I would have getting an actual date is family genealogy, journals and church records. I'm going to check out the rest of the microfilm selection at FHC has for Samoa.

Scroll down the rest of the American and Western Samoa page. There is much more to see.












01 May 2013

Wordless Wednesday---Grandma's Fine Mat

Here is a close up of one of the fine mat's my grandma gave to me.


National Library of New Zealand....Opening our data.

I was just on this site yesterday searching for information. I've talked about this site with some of my family members. They never knew that the National Library of New Zealand had anything on Samoa or even thought they would find any information for our family history. So, when I shared this site with them they were excited.

The National Library of New Zealand recently launched the New Open Data of their website. Here's more of what they said,

"The National Library recently launched the new Open Data section of our website, which supplies access to sources of raw library information for anyone to download, examine and use. We do this happily, as part of the New Zealand Open Access and Licensing framework and Open Government Information and Data Re-use Work Programme.

We have always endeavoured to supply our patrons with easy-to-use search interfaces, so that anyone can find our materials using only a web browser. But for those who might have more sophisticated needs, the ability to work with large amounts of data and have access to a particular collection's records all at once can be a key part of crafting a more powerful solution to their research problems.

For these "power users", the new Open Data section consolidates our "big data" offerings from around the site, and some work behind the scenes means those datasets now stay up-to-date. We encourage anyone who is interested to download and use them, including:

Researchers interested in analysing the entire holdings of the library at once.
Library, archives and museum technologists wanting to make connections between their institution's holdings and ours.
"Data hackers" who get excited by unearthing the interesting stories hidden in mountains of numbers and database records.
Entrepreneurs who will use it to build innovative new applications we've only dreamed of: visualisations, collection explorers, new kinds of searches.
Students interested in exploring the data kept by a large public institution, and learning how to manipulate it.
In addition, by publishing this data regularly and in standard formats, the Library itself can become its own best customer for open data. An institution the size of the National Library can have dozens, or even hundreds, of internal systems that it uses to keep track of its information, and getting those systems to talk to each other can be a monumental task.

By understanding the most common ways our data is being used, we can design better and easier-to-use information management and delivery systems and improve our services, both inside the institution and out.

Our initial Open Data offerings include:

Publications New Zealand metadata- Approximately 385,000 bibliographic records from New Zealand's national bibliography. Downloadable and updated every week.

DigitalNZ metadata - Metadata describing over 26 million pieces of digital content from all over the country, with real-time access via the application programming interface (API).

Papers Past metadata - A large and popular part of the DigitalNZ metadata is the Papers Past historical newspaper collection. Over 24 million items from this collection can be accessed through the DigitalNZ API.

We're planning to add much more in the future. Please keep an eye on the Open Data section, and follow us on Twitter to keep updated when new data sets are added, or when the Library is part of any new policy developments in the world of open and free content. We'd love for you to take this data and build something cool with it. And if you do, be sure to get in touch and let us know!

By Michael Lascarides
Michael is the manager of National Library Online in DigitalNZ.


This is totally exciting to me!! I can't wait to take a look on the NLNZ Open Data site. See what kind of resources they have that could help me along in my research. 
Here's a few quick searches I did.

Results of a 'Samoa' search


I tried a few villages in the search box: Fogatuli had no results. Apia had results. PagoPago no results. I tried one of my family names in the search: Afualo. All I got was an image. Try a variety of different searches, first and last names, villages, titles, a term or even a samoan word. Depending on what's in the collections you may get results or not.